History

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BATTERY PARK CITY PARKS
The Battery Park City Parks Conservancy is a non-profit organization supported mainly by the residents of Battery Park City and its commercial and residential developers, as well as by the Battery Park City Authority. We also receive and welcome generous public donations. Our properties are operated and maintained at no cost to the City of New York. Our staff consists of gardeners, cleaners, plumbers, electricians, stone masons, educators, lifeguards, and yoga instructors.

The master plan for Battery Park City specifies that 30% of the site must be held as open space, not built upon. The project’s parks, gardens, plazas, playgrounds and other public places are permanently protected as “mapped parkland” by the City of New York. They are officially considered to be independently operated units of the NY City park system. Despite the master plan, the Battery Park City Authority has actually built more parks than originally planned. As of today, there are 36 acres of publicly available open space.

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BATTERY PARK CITY
In 1962 as the piers in southwestern Manhattan fell into greater and greater decay the first plan to revitalize the Hudson shoreline downtown was presented. In 1968 the Battery Park City Authority was established to manage development of the future site. By 1976, the 92 acre landfill on which Battery Park City rests was completed although the 1970’s financial crisis delayed further development until late in 1979. By 1980, Battery Park City’s first residential development, Gateway Plaza, was under construction. As construction continued, Rector Park, a portion of the Esplanade, and the World Financial Center were operational by the end of 1988. The 1990’s witnessed an explosion of growth in Battery Park City, as schools, residential buildings, commercial buildings, parks, and public art installations filled in the once vacant landfill. Today, development is almost complete and Battery Park City is home to over 13,000 residents and thousands more workers each day.