FRIDAY NIGHT ART HOUSE CLASSICS: THE HARDER THEY COME

The best art house cinema is characterized by filmmakers with uncompromising vision. This series features courageous films inspired by the civil rights movement. The Harder They Come is a 1972 Jamaican film that features Jimmy Cliff as an aspiring young singer from the countryside who travels to Kingston to pursue musical stardom. After being victimized by an unscrupulous record producer, the local drug trade and corrupt police, he fights back and becomes an inadvertent folk hero. Free popcorn will be served, and a discussion will follow the screenings.

*Mature audiences only.

FRIDAY NIGHT ART HOUSE CLASSICS: SHADOWS

The best art house cinema is characterized by independent filmmakers with uncompromising vision. This series features courageous films inspired by the civil rights movement. Shadows is a 1958 American independent dramatic film directed by John Cassavetes about race relations during the Beat Generation years in NYC. Free popcorn will be served, and a discussion will follow the screenings. Mature audiences only.

TUESDAY TALKS: EXPLORING THE AFRICAN BURIAL GROUND MEMORIAL

In celebration of Black History Month, guest speaker T. Rasul Murray, a historical interpreter and griot at the African Burial Ground National Monument, will present an overview of this sacred site in Lower Manhattan which honors African Americans and informs on the hardships they endured in early America. Discovered in 1991, the burial ground is considered to be one of the most significant archaeological finds in the U.S. over the last 100 years.

WRITE ME FILM SCREENING AND ARTIST & ACTIVIST TALKBACK

Write Me (2019; 7 mins.) follows a Holocaust survivor and a survivor of human trafficking regaining power over their bodies by removing physical evidence of “branding.” Write Me is adapted from the poem, “After Auschwitz,” by Deborah Kahan Kolb, and premieres at New York Jewish Film Festival. The preview screening will be followed by a discussion with director Pearl Gluck, poet Deborah Kahan Kolb, composer Lisa Gutkin, Auschwitz survivor Shirley Gottesman, trafficking survivor Barbara Freeman and tattoo artist Virginia Elwood. The free evening is part of a series to engage audiences in conversations on art, social justice, and history. Write Me programs are made possible through a community partnership with the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust and the Battery Park City Authority.

FRIDAY NIGHT ART HOUSE CLASSICS: PUTNEY SWOPE

The best art house cinema is characterized by independent filmmakers with uncompromising vision. This series features courageous films inspired by the civil rights movement. Putney Swope is a 1969 satirical comedy film about a black advertising executive. The film satirizes the advertising world, the portrayal of race in Hollywood films, the white power structure and the nature of corporate corruption. Free popcorn will be served, and a discussion will follow the screenings.

*Mature audiences only.