FRIDAY NIGHT ART HOUSE CLASSICS: SHADOWS

The best art house cinema is characterized by independent filmmakers with uncompromising vision. This series features courageous films inspired by the civil rights movement. Shadows is a 1958 American independent dramatic film directed by John Cassavetes about race relations during the Beat Generation years in NYC. Free popcorn will be served, and a discussion will follow the screenings. Mature audiences only.

WRITE ME FILM SCREENING AND ARTIST & ACTIVIST TALKBACK

Write Me (2019; 7 mins.) follows a Holocaust survivor and a survivor of human trafficking regaining power over their bodies by removing physical evidence of “branding.” Write Me is adapted from the poem, “After Auschwitz,” by Deborah Kahan Kolb, and premieres at New York Jewish Film Festival. The preview screening will be followed by a discussion with director Pearl Gluck, poet Deborah Kahan Kolb, composer Lisa Gutkin, Auschwitz survivor Shirley Gottesman, trafficking survivor Barbara Freeman and tattoo artist Virginia Elwood. The free evening is part of a series to engage audiences in conversations on art, social justice, and history. Write Me programs are made possible through a community partnership with the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust and the Battery Park City Authority.

FRIDAY NIGHT ART HOUSE CLASSICS: PUTNEY SWOPE

The best art house cinema is characterized by independent filmmakers with uncompromising vision. This series features courageous films inspired by the civil rights movement. Putney Swope is a 1969 satirical comedy film about a black advertising executive. The film satirizes the advertising world, the portrayal of race in Hollywood films, the white power structure and the nature of corporate corruption. Free popcorn will be served, and a discussion will follow the screenings.

*Mature audiences only.

FRIDAY NIGHT FILM NOIR: THE PHANTOM LADY

Film noir is a style of American crime film originating in the 1940’s. Often made on shoestring budgets, these low light, high intrigue detective stories are now regarded as classics from Hollywood’s Golden Age. The Phantom Lady (1944, Robert Siodmak) is the story of a mystery woman who must be tracked down to prevent an innocent man from being convicted of his wife’s murder. The film showcases the influence of European Expressionism on American film noir. Free popcorn will be served, and a discussion will follow the screenings.